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Grilles Gone Wild: The Internet reacts to the 2022 Toyota Tundra

Original source (on modern site) | Article images: [1] [2] [3] [4]

There's no shortage of opinion on social media about the new Big T

Author of the article:

Matthew Guy

Photo by Toyota Canada

After an eternity of drip-drop teasers, Toyota has unleashed its new full-size truck. It's still called the Tundra, of course, but that's about all it shares with the old pickup — save for the continued availability of the tremendous full-width retractable rear window.

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Our own Derek McNaughton has a full rundown of changes, so be sure to head over there for details about powertrain and suspension changes.

The most visible of alterations? Its styling, naturally. Toyota largely stayed the course for 14 long years with the old Tundra, making this type of redesign more significant than most.

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  2. First Look: 2022 Toyota Tundra and Tundra TRD Pro

Since the internet is a sewer wealth of opinion and judgment, we donned our Postmedia hazmat suit (standard company-issue) and waded into the minefield of comments about this new player in the cutthroat full-size truck market.

There's no shortage of commentary about that maw of a grille:

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Thats an UGLY looking Grill Yuck!! Not sure why Toyota has fascination with UGLY designs.

— T2 (@arihantk) September 20, 2021

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The soft touches on the dash look good. Side profile is also good. Grill is a little weird but I guess it matches Toyota styling.

— Craig Campbell (@805CC) September 20, 2021

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But there are plaudits about the interior, a place where the driver spends 100 per cent of their time.

It should be noted the new Tundra has, by diagonal measure spanning a vast 14 inches, one of the largest infotainment screens in its class. Orientated in landscape fashion like the new F-150 instead of vertically like the Ram 1500 gives ample acreage for digital displays.

The interior upgrades seem to be in line with others - Ram may still have edge but they definitely closed the gap. I'm on my 2nd - 2nd gen Tundra and have been waiting for interior and MPG upgrades. 13MPG can't cut it anymore so most interested in that.

— Chris Slater (@cowboysandlobos) September 20, 2021

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In addition to conquest buyers, there's a solid chance there will be more than a few repeat customers opening their wallets when this thing goes on sale. Truck buyers are, traditionally, a very brand-loyal lot but those absolutes seem to be on the wane. Many people buy pickups as their main family vehicle, and brand loyalty is less of a concern to Joe and Josephine Consumer than it is to diehard truck fans.

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So I'm loving the 2022 #Tundra TRD Pro 🥰. Hoping the MPG exceeds my 2017 #Tundra TRD Pro. So far my expectations have been met, Hybrid TRD Pro, ventilated seats, black interior, wireless CarPlay. Can we opt out of the technical camo? Colors? Cement 👌

— Matthew Rider (@RiderfromKY) September 20, 2021

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Though someone made an excellent point about other possible uses for these new powertrains. Anyone fancy a 4Runner with nearly 600 lb-ft of torque?

While it is true the 4Runner has long since paid for its development costs and is now basically a license for Toyota to print money, it would up the model's game even further if it suddenly found itself in command of Tundra's new engines (and, yes, we realize the limits of 4Runner's platform — it's nice to dream).

Notable improvements to the engine and transmission. Pity that Toyota does not put this much effort into the 4Runner.

— Crazy Driver NY (@CrazyDriverNY1) September 20, 2021

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We'll also take this opportunity that, back in the mid-'90s, Toyota floated the idea of calling itsnew truck the 'T150' which predictably sent everyone at Ford into a snivelling tizzy. This explains the eventual nod to the frozen north. Fun fact: in exchange, the Blue Oval agreed to drop the numbers from its then-new LS6 and LS8 sedans (Lexus has sold the LS 400 sedan and its variants over the years).

[We're going to give the last - and best - reaction to Driving.ca contributor Brendan McAleer, whose truck apathy is matched only by his wit, as evidenced by his Tweet below. —Ed.]

Regarding the new Toyota pickup: don't much care until they make a Newfoundland Edition called the Lard Tundra Jaysus.

— Brendan McAleer (@brendan_mcaleer) September 20, 2021

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